Tigers International events offering taste around the globe

Campus dining options at the University of West Alabama don’t normally include Samovar-brewed Russian teas, dalgona candies from Korea, French crepes or street-style Asian fusion delicacies. But that changes briefly next week when the UWA Office of International Programs hosts the university’s first International Education Week. Over five days, international student volunteers will present programs that will educate the campus community about their nations’ cultures.

Engineering Tech path paved at UWA for Shelton transfers

Formal agreement allows eligible Shelton State graduates to transfer to UWA for bachelor of science in engineering technology Formal agreement allows eligible Shelton State graduates to transfer to UWA for bachelor of science in engineering technology Sixty miles separate the University of West Alabama from Shelton State Community College’s campus, but a new agreement between those institutions is opening a pathway for engineering students who want to further their education in Livingston.

UWA puts wheels under skills training, career exploration | University of West Alabama

Skills on Wheels mobile units deploy across Black Belt region to fill the gaps in workforce development and secondary education Skills on Wheels mobile units deploy across Black Belt region to fill the gaps in workforce development and secondary education For a year amid the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of West Alabama has dispatched its fleet of Skills on Wheels mobile lab units to sites throughout 10 counties of Alabama’s expansive Black Belt region. Once there

The hunt for Mabila

For two-plus years, Dumas and a team of archaeologists, volunteers, and UWA students have used GPS technology in Marengo County to document precise locations of pottery sherds, metal remnants and other artifacts they’ve determined are from the mid-16th century. When plotted on a map, the GPS coordinates have allowed them to pinpoint 141 distinct farmsteads -- small Native American homes each less than an acre in size -- that comprised one of the communities under Chief Tuskaloosa’s control.
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